Online Panels

Day 1 (Monday, 16 November)

Intro video

Biodiversity loss and ecosystem collapse are ranked as one of the top five threats humanity will face in the next 10 years. Human population growth, increasing consumption and a poor resource efficiency mainly lead to an overexploitation of the nature, the extinction of flora and fauna, rising levels of greenhouse gases and to the disruption of entire ecosystems. Dysfunctional ecosystems provoke increasingly large and regular natural disasters be it extreme heat, droughts, floods, insect plagues or many others. Even the current Covid-19 pandemic is possibly triggered by human disturbance of the nature. These disasters have a direct impact on our lives and livelihoods. They destroy the basis for our economic potential as the loss of diversity causes the loss of nearly 50% of the world GDP. Biodiversity is therefore a geopolitical resource and its more likely that the future leading economies are those that can succeed in conserving their biodiversity and in creating sustainable business models.

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Panel:

  • Lily Ajarova, CEO Uganda Tourism Board
  • Juliet Abaliwano, Programme Officer Water and Environment, AFD
  • Hilda Nakabuye, Climate Activist

Moderated by Raymond Mujuni - Journalist Nation Media

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Day 2 (Wednesday, 18 November)

Intro video

With over half of the population living in urban areas and the numbers increasing daily, cities have become a political weight of their own while facing unprecedented demographic, environmental, economic, social and spatial challenges at the same time. While traditional geopolitics often refer to countries and their relations, cities also practice international relations, both bilaterally and multilaterally. How will this reshape traditional foreign relations? Given the challenges the (mega)cities share, their outstanding position and their interest in cooperation and networking to boost urban resilience, are cities able to reshape foreign relations and bring a positive drive into them that is oriented towards burden sharing rather than competition? What are the successful examples of such cooperation? What are the obstacles? How does the role of cities as global players resonate in their relationship with the national level?

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Panel:

  • Christine Moro, DAECT
  • Emana Nsikan-George, Project Manager Climate Aliance, Karlsruhe-Kampala Climate Partnership
  • Deborah Asikeit Musiime, Cities Alliance
  • Caroline Sawe, Expertise France, Kenya

Moderated by Ivan Rugambwa - Journalist, Political Commentator KFM Hot Seat

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Day 3 (Friday, 20 November)

Intro video

The Covid-19 Pandemic with its triple hit on health, education and income is a threat to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. The implications of the pandemic once again made it obvious that we need to join forces if we do not want to leave anyone behind. In this context, the private sector is an indispensable actor that can and should contribute to achieving the common Vision 2030.

Private sector, and especially MSMEs (Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises), does not only contribute to the economic development, creates jobs and drives innovation. It can also serve as an example and set standards when it comes to gender equality, social inclusion, combatting climate change and achieving other development goals. Private sector is in the position to even set higher standards than outlined by the legal framework and push for more cooperation and collaboration worldwide.

A strong private sector can advocate for more intergovernmental cooperation and serve as a driving force for regional and international networks that include different stakeholders. This is why we want to discuss the geopolitical role of the private sector with creative and innovative entrepreneurs from the region but also with experts on international economic relations.

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Panel:

  • Wilfrid Do Rego, President of the Conseil Présidentiel pour l’Afrique (CPA)
  • Godfrey Nzamujo, Director Songai Center
  • Didier Acouetey, Founder and President of AfricSearch
  • Veronika Ertl, Advisor on Development Policy, Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung

Moderated by Sandrah Twinoburyo - News Anchor on NTV, Initiator of the initiative “Unemployment Ends with Me”

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Day 4 (Monday, 23 November)

Intro video

River Nile, the world's longest river flowing 6,700 kilometers through ten countries is a natural resource of fundamental geopolitical concerns. Contested by 10 countries with influence from other foreign actors for centuries, current struggles between Egypt and Ethiopia over the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam project is a classic illustration. What lies behind the sensitive geopolitical context of the water of the Nile? What do these struggles mean for the stability and securitization of the Nile Water Basin? What’s the place for dialogue in finding sustainable solutions to the geopolitical conundrums of the Nile Water Basin?   What possibilities exist for turning River Nile into a resource for broader cooperation and integration?

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Panel:

  • Thomas Tödling, Head of the Department EU-Projects Konrad Adenauer Stiftung
  • Revocatus Twinomuhangi, Scholar from Makerere University
  • Dr. Juan Carlos Sanchez, Advisor, Transboundary Wetland Management in the Nile Basin, Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH

Moderatred by Fredric Musisi - Journalist

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Day 5 (Wednesday, 25 November)

Intro video

Africa is Europe’s closest neighbor. The European Union is Africa’s first partner in trade, in foreign investment and in development. Africa and Europe are two plural continents, sharing a complex history and hoping for a promising future. Our shared history is often not easy to talk about without causing tensed debates. The crimes of European colonization are indisputable and are part of this common history. Europe maintains an unwavering historical bond with Africa, steeped in suffering but also fraternity and mutual aid.

Is it really possible to envision and invent, in full awareness of this history, a future between our two continents? This new relationship, articulated around a value, respect, and a principle, partnership at what scale should we rethink it? At the scale of cities, regions, countries, continents? Who will be the main players? Citizens, non-governmental organizations, businesses? Our relationship promises to grow even richer, and within this framework can the European Union and the African Union help to structure the pooling of our best assets, for shared benefits?

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Panel:

  • Ludovic Moriniere, Regional Director West and Central Africa @BreakingPoint
  • Yusuf Kiranda ,University Secretary, Makerere University
  • Magali Chelpi, Research Fellow IRIS

Moderated by Canary Mugume - Journalist NBS TV

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Day 6 (Friday, 27 November)

Intro video

The International Organization of the Francophonie (OIF) estimates that in 2050, Africa could be home to nearly 85% of French speakers (compared to 12% for Europe). Given the demographic projections, the total number of French speakers in the world would also rise in the meantime from 274 million to 700 million, making French the second most spoken language in the world after Mandarin. According to Charles Onyango-Obbo, a Ugandan author and journalist, French will be the 2nd most spoken language in East Africa by 2045. The larger sub-region gathers an impressive number of Francophones, with more than 80 million French speaking inhabitants in DRC. But the term “Francophonie” goes far beyond the language dimension. It reflects different realities, not exclusively linguistic or geographic, but also cultural. The French-speaking world is a fertile political, economic and cultural breeding ground in Africa. Will the Francophonie therefore set the framework for cultural ties, economic relations and geopolitical interests within the entire African continent?

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Panel:

  • Amb. Libérat Mfumukeko, Secretary General, East African Community OR East African Community, Co-operation in Political Matters, International Relations Department
  • Dr. Christopher Lutaaya / Dr. Edith Natukunda, French lecturer, Makerere University
  • N'Goné Fall, General Commissioner, Season Africa 2020
  • Jean-Marc Berthon, Cabinet Director of the General Secretary of the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie
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